Auto insurance requirements in Missouri

The State of Missouri has very specific laws governing what types and amounts of auto insurance it requires drivers to carry.

Every state in the nation has different requirements laid out when it comes to automobile insurance. In Missouri, most drivers expect and should trust that other drivers are properly insured so that if an accident occurs, proper compensation may be available. Sadly, that is not always the case, despite the fact that the state does mandate all drivers to carry insurance coverage. Understanding what Missouri's laws are in this regard can be helpful to people both before and after an accident happens.

What types of insurance coverage must a driver have?

According to the Missouri Department of Insurance, there are two types of coverage that every driver in the state should carry. The first is uninsured motorist coverage and the second is liability coverage.

As the name implies, uninsured motorist insurance is there to help pay for damage that results from a crash caused by a driver who does not have insurance.

Liability insurance is the coverage that is meant to help accident victims. For example, if a car is responsible for an accident with a van, liability insurance may pay for damage to the van. The liability coverage may also pay for the cost of medical treatment necessary by people in the van at the time of the accident. This treatment would be limited to anything directly related to injuries sustained in the accident.

Is there a specific amount of insurance that must be carried?

For both uninsured motorist insurance and liability insurance, every driver must have a policy that provides at least $25,000 worth of coverage for injury to a single person for a given accident. The policy must also provide at least $50,000 worth of coverage for injuries to multiple people in an accident.

For liability insurance, there is an added requirement. A policy must provide at least $10,000 worth of coverage for damage to another person's property in a single accident.

Is there any option to avoid insurance?

The Missouri Department of Revenue explains that there are two legal options via which people may be exempt from carrying personal auto insurance. However, these are not commonly utilized.

One of these options is to have a certificate related to a religious organization or a company that proves the institution is self-insured. The other is to have a special certificate filed with the state that proves a driver is personally self-insured.

How can I learn more about insurance requirements in Missouri?

Talking to an attorney is always a good idea when it comes to learning about the law. Getting information from a lawyer may help people not only learn what is required but how to get help if they are injured in an accident.